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Dr. Gerald Regni Jr & Associates

DENTISTRY FOR CHILDREN & TEENAGERS

By Gerald Regni, DMD on April 09, 2013

WHEN WILL MY BABY START GETTING TEETH?

kids-teethingTeething, the process of baby (primary) teeth coming through the gums into the mouth, is variable among individual babies. Some babies get their teeth early and some get them late. In general the first baby teeth are usually the lower front (anterior) teeth and usually begin erupting between ages 6-8 months.

WHEN SHOULD I BRING MY CHILD FOR THEIR FIRST VISIT?

The American Academy of Dentistry recommends six month visits to the dentist beginning at your child‛s first birthday. Routine visits will start your child on a lifetime of good dental health.

Your dentist may also recommend protective sealants or home fluoride treatment for your child. Sealants can be applied to your child‛s molars to prevent decay on hard to clean surfaces.

WHAT ARE SEALANTS?

A sealants is a clear or shaded plastic material that is applied to the chewing surfaces (grooves) of the back teeth (premolars and molars), where four out of five cavities in children are found. This sealant acts as a barrier to food, plaque and acid, thus protecting the decay-prone areas of the teeth.

BABY BOTTLE TOOTH DECAY

One serious form of decay among your children is baby bottle decay. This condition is caused by frequent and long exposures of an infant‛s teeth to liquid that contain sugar. Among these liquids are milk (including breast milk), formula, fruit juice and other sweetened drinks.

Putting a baby to bed for a nap or at night with a bottle other than water can cause serious and rapid tooth decay. Sweet liquid pools around the child‛s teeth giving plaque bacteria an opportunity to produce acids that attack tooth enamels. If you must give the baby a bottle as a comforter at bedtime, it should contain only water.

After each feeding, wipe the baby‛s gums and teeth with a damp washcloth or gauze pad to remove plaque. The easiest way to do this is to sit down, place the child‛s head in your lap or lay the child on a dressing table or the floor. Whatever position you use, be sure you can see into child‛s mouth easily.

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